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  Исполнитель(и) :
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  Наименование CD :
   J.J. Johnson Play "Mack The Knife"



Год издания : 2009

Компания звукозаписи : Lone Hill Jazz

Музыкальный стиль : Hard Bop

Время звучания : 1:08:23

Код CD : 8 436019 583760

  Комментарий (рецензия) :

CD, стоящие на полке рядом : Jazz (Small Orchestra - Bop)      

Digitally remastered CD containing the complete 1962 quartet LP ...Plays Mack the Knife, appearing here on CD for the first time ever. It presents Jazz trombonist Johnson fronting a quartet that includes Andr' Previn on piano, Red Mitchell on bass and Frank Capp on drums playing songs by the celebrated Kurt Weill. 18 tracks. Lonehill. 2009.

Recording information: Los Angeles (06/23/1960-06/24/1960); New York (06/23/1960-06/24/1960); Los Angeles (06/28/1960); New York (06/28/1960); Los Angeles (12/31/1961); New York (12/31/1961)

This project was the idea of Andre Previn and Irv Townsend at Columbia Records in which J.J. Johnson was asked to participate. Johnson's memories of the session indicate that this was for him essentially a studio call, a response to a challenge posed by Previn.

"I got a call about this. It intrigued me. When I talked to Andre he was very nice about it...neither of us knew how it would turn out. We were from such different backgrounds...I did it as a challenge...to see if we could bring any chemistry to it. And we did." - J.J. Johnson in a 1992 interview

Don't expect to hear another worn out version of "Mack the Knife" as Previn decided to take this into the realm of bitonality.

"Years ago (early 60s?), I recall hearing Andre Previn at a night club in London with the bebop trombonist JJ Johnson. I went to hear Previn but Johnson was an unexpected bonus. They played a set of Kurt Weill songs and announced they'd play "Mack the Knife." You could feel the room groan - "ANOTHER version of 'Mack the Knife' - do we really need to hear this?" - was the collective vibe in the room. Until they started to play. Turns out we DID need to hear it. Previn and the bass player (forget who it was) set down the intro in G flat and when Johnson came in, he played in C. After Johnson played through the tune once, they flipped keys. Later, the whole improv was in C until they flipped back in the coda to the bitonality. It was stunning. The room erupted. They DID say something new. Of course it wasn't new at all. But it was smart, clean, clear, neat and it resolved. And we all went humming the tune (in both keys) and slept well. Even after hearing "contemporary music."

- Fusedule Tecil

====

This release contains the complete LP Plays Mack the Knife, appearing here on CD for the first time ever, it presents Johnson fronting a quartet that includes Andre Previn on piano, Red Mitchell on bass and Frank Capp on drums playing songs by the celebrated Kurt Weill. As a bonus, we have added another complete LP by Johnson, Trombone and Voices, which also appears here on CD for the first time ever. Although we are aware that the concept and arrangements on this bonus album might seem outdated, we believe that J. J.'s solos clearly merit it being reissued.

Original Liner Notes

J. J. Johnson/Andre Previn Play "Mack the Knife" and other Kurt Weill Songs

Although it was on such Broadway shows as Knickerbocker Holiday and Lady in the Dark that Kurt Weill built the superstructure of his reputation, the foundation of his contribution to 20th-century music lay in operas and operettas. It is mainly from this field that Andre Previn selected material for this album. The "Bilbao Song" and "Surabaya-Johnny" are from Happy End, one of Weill's lesser known shows. "Wie man sich bettet" is from the early opera Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny. The rest were drawn from the work that has earned him most of his posthumous glory, Die Dreigroschenoper, better known as The Threepenny Opera, adapted from John Gay's Beggar's Opera, a smash hit of England's 1728 theatrical season, and now familiar, through its better-known melodies, to numberless listeners.

There is in much of Weill's early music a strong and nostalgic link with the Zeitgeist of Germany in the 1920s. In sketching routines for these jazz interpretations, Previn has retained this essential flavor. There are even hints of program music. When a carousel atmosphere was part of the original setting, you will observe, it is achieved here by subtle indirection, as is the cops-and-robbers mood of the last band on Side 1, dedicated to "Pirate Jenny".

The teaming of Andre Previn with J. J. Johnson, aside from the direct musical accomplishments to which it leads, provides a reminder that the two are far closer together spiritually than might have been suspected. Johnson, born in 1924 in Indianapolis, spent his late teens touring with territory bands. In 1945, when he was winding up a three-year incumbency with Benny Carter's orchestra, Andre had begun to attract attention as a teen-age prodigy and had made his recording debut.

Culturally, geographically, the two were thousands of miles apart in development, as they had been from birth. Yet at this time, both were touched by the impact of the new jazz. Just as surely as J. J. was to become a prime moving force in the bop movement, along with Dizzy Gillespie and Charlie Parker, Andre was to come under the influence of the same trend and its leading exponents, notably Bud Powell.

In effect, from the standpoint of improvisation, Johnson and Previn are products of the same forces in jazz. It was logical that their ideas should blend so effectively in this collaboration. (Another link, of course, is that both are versed in classical music and are skilled composers and arrangers; both, therefore, respect the integrity of Weill and his melodies.)

With bassist Red Mitchell and drummer Frank Capp on hand to lend rhythmic undercurrent, Andre was able to make of this quartet a whole that was even more than the very considerable sum of its parts.

The ingenious weaving of contrapuntal lines, as in the "Overture", gave the unit an extraordinarily well-organized sound. The lyrical, muted mood established by J. J. in "Wie man sich bettet", the blues-like assertions of Andre in "Unzulanglichkeit", give the lie to the latter title, which means inadequacy or insufficiency.

The most interesting challenge offered by the session was that of "Moritat" (alias "Mack the Knife"). What could possibly be done to bring some new life and fresh character to a theme on which everyone -from Dick Hyman to Louis Armstrong to Bobby Darin to Ella Fitzgerald -seemed to have said the last word?

Andre had the answer. As you will hear, it came in the shape of a delightful exercise in bitonality (G flat for Previn, ? for Johnson) and one of the most unexpected of endings -unexpected, yet unarguably logical, and humorous in the crafty Previn manner.

====

Original Liner Notes

J. J. Johnson - Trombone And Voices

Let me briefly tell you about this new album by J. J. Johnson, J. J. Johnson, Trombone and Voices. It will warm your heart to hear the soft sounds in "Jennie's Song" or "Sometimes I Feel Like a Motherless Child". And listen to the excitement of "Get Out of Town" or "To the Ends of the Earth".

This album marks one of those rare occasions when idea, artist and arranger met in a harmonious blending of talent. It has often been said that the timbre of the trombone closely resembles that of the human voice. Too often the coupling of an instrument with voice or voices can lead to utter chaos -but not in this case.

This album by J. J. reminds me of the great record made some time ago by the late Charlie Parker with voices -"Old Folks" and "In the Still of the Night".

TEO MACERO, August 24,1960

====

The complete quartet LP Plays Mack the Knife, appearing here on CD for the first time ever. It presents Johnson fronting a quartet that includes Andre Previn on piano, Red Mitchell on bass and Frank Capp on drums playing songs by the celebrated Kurt Weill. As a bonus, we have added another complete LP by Johnson, Trombone and Voices, which also appears here on CD for the first time ever.

====

This release contains the complete LP "Plays Mack the Knife" (1961), appearing here on CD for the first time ever. It presents Johnson fronting a quartet that includes Andre Previn on piano, Red Mitchell on bass and Frank Capp on drums -quartet recordings are not especially common in Johnson's discography- playing songs by the celebrated Kurt Weill.

As a bonus, another complete LP by Johnson, "Trombone and Voices" (1960), which also appears here on CD for the first time. Although we are aware that the concept and arrangements on this bonus album might seen outdated, we believe that J.J.'s solos clearly merit it being reissued.


  Соисполнители :

Frank Capp (Drums)
Red Mitchell (Bass)


№ п/п

Наименование трека

Текст

Длительность

Комментарий
   1 Bilbao Song (From Happy End)         0:04:05  
   2 Barbara Song (From The Threepenny Opera)         0:06:06  
   3 Overture (From The Threepenny Opera)         0:05:03  
   4 Seerauber Jenny (From The Threepenny Opera)         0:04:21  
   5 Mack The Knife (AKA 'Moritat') (From The Threepenny Opera)         0:04:53  
   6 Surabaya-Johnny (From Happy End)         0:04:14  
   7 Wie Man Sich Bettet (From Rise And Fall Of The City Of Mahagonny)         0:06:08  
   8 Unzulanglichkeit (From The Threepenny Opera)         0:04:53  
   9 Portrait Of Jenny See All 2         0:03:31  
   10 Only The Lonely     T       0:02:31  
   11 Sometimes I Feel Like A Motherless Child         0:03:11  
   12 In A Sentimental Mood     T       0:02:35  
   13 Get Out Of Town         0:02:16  
   14 I'm Glad There Is You     T       0:03:56  
   15 You're My Girl         0:02:57  
   16 To The Ends Of The Earth         0:02:20  
   17 What Is There To Say         0:02:24  
   18 Lazy Bones         0:02:59  

      Обозначения:

 T   'щелкнуть' - переход к тексту композиции.

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Последние изменения в документе сделаны 20/10/2016 22:12:07

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