Описание CD

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  Исполнитель(и) :
   Hawes, Hampton  (Piano)
◄◄◄        ►►►

  Наименование CD :
   Everybody Likes Hampton Hawes. Vol 3



Год издания : 2004

Компания звукозаписи : Contemporary

Музыкальный стиль : Mainstream Jazz, Bop, Hard Bop

Время звучания : 44:08

Код CD : CONTEMPORARY CCD-3523-2 (0 25218-4871-2 2)

  Комментарий (рецензия) :

CD, стоящие на полке рядом : Jazz (Small Orchestra - Bop)      

Recorded on January 25, 1956 at Contemporary's Studio, Los Angeles, CA

The third of three Hampton Hawes trio dates with bassist Red Mitchell and drummer Chuck Thompson (all reissued on CD) is on the same high level as his first two. Hawes introduces his "Coolin' the Blues" and "The Sermon," digs into eight standards (including "Somebody Loves Me," "Night In Tunisia" and "Billy Boy") and comes up with consistently creative ideas throughout this swinging bop date.

All Music Guide

========= from the cover ==========

Hampton Hawes, young Los Angeles pianist, skyrocketed to national prominence late in 1955, after a two-year stint in the Army had interrupted a career which had started so promisingly. Upon his return to Los Angeles in 1955, he formed his Trio, was booked into the Haig, and promptly created a sensation in the local jazz world. His first recordings for Contemporary created the same sensation nationally. Down Beat critic Nat Hentoff wrote, "This is the most exciting album I've heard from the Coast in the over two years that I've been reviewing records for the Beat. Pianist Hawes, backed magnificently by bassist Red Mitchell and solidly by drummer Chuck Thompson, comes through here as potentially the most vital young jazz pianist since Bud Powell in terms of fire, soul, beat, and guts . . ." Metronome, in its yearbook 1955, hailed him as an "Arrival of the Year." In 1956, after a successful run at the Tiffany in Los Angeles, he left in March for an extended tour which took him to Cleveland, Rochester, Boston, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Washington, Toronto, and New York, and will take him to Chicago and St. Louis before he returns to Los Angeles late in August. Shortly after the following notes were written, Hawes was voted "New Star" on piano for 1956 by the annual poll of leading jazz critics conducted by Down Beat magazine.

Even the most roseate recruiting pamphlet has scarcely dared to picture that period spent by contemporary males in the Armed Forces as a rare opportunity for creative development. But both recruiting pamphlets and creative artists in flux may be overlooking a situation that is pregnant with possibilities. As Hampton Hawes found during his period in uniform, this can be a valuable vacuum. It gave him the chance at a crucial point in his formative days to get away temporarily from the often blinding confusions and hurly-burly of the day-to-day jazz scene and calmly to pull his artistic loose ends together.

The loose ends had started accumulating when he was four and tried to pick out chords on the family piano. By his own account, he really started playing when he was nine. During his teens he was, quite naturally, influenced by other pianists. But as he moved into his twenties (this would be in the late Forties) he started to form his own conception and to develop his own style. It was a provocative, often exciting style, but did not yet have a predominantly original quality which could be identified as pure Hawes. This, of course, is a situation common to many musicians today when they are unable to find the time or the opportunity to assimilate the indiscriminate haul of stylistic odds and ends in which they have become enmeshed.

Hawes ran into luck, however, although at the time it seemed quite the opposite. His luck came in the form of a beckon from Uncle Sam in 1953 and, during his service in the U.S. and overseas, he found himself with pianos handy, and more time to practice than he had ever had before. By a happy coincidence, he was practically isolated from jazz at this particular time. Sheltered by this combination of circumstances, his own musical personality took its definite shape.

"I couldn't be influenced by anybody then," Hawes has said of this period of isolation, "because I couldn't hear anybody."

By the time he got out of the Army, Hawes's earlier influences had been reduced to mere suggestive echoes in his playing. All that remained of them were those elements which could contribute to his own sense of jazz fitness. He became himself rather than an amalgam-a warm, thoughtful, swinging musician whose inclination is to express himself within a cool framework.

The Hawes you hear on these selections is the end result of almost 20 years of pianistic growth. But this should not be taken as the ultimate Hawes. He is not a static musician. He has reached his present state of development because he has been eternally dissatisfied. He is still dissatisfied. He is still searching and reaching. He feels that he hasn't really come into his own yet.

"There's so much to be learned on the piano every day you play," he has said. "It's a lifetime instrument. Once I told Art Tatum that I was trying to play something and wondering when I could get it. Art said, 'Don't worry, I've been doing the same thing all my life. There's no limit to what you can do.'"

It was this sense of searching development which prompted Hawes to hold back "Polka Dots and Moonbeams" until his third LP. He plays relative changes on the basic chords in the first eight bars, rather than the actual chords of the tune, and he wasn't satisfied that he had found the right pure Hawes. This, of course, is a situation common to many musicians today when they are unable to find the time or the opportunity to assimilate the indiscriminate haul of stylistic odds and ends in which they have become enmeshed.

Hawes ran into luck, however, although at the time it seemed quite the opposite. His luck came in the form of a beckon from Uncle Sam in 1953 and, during his service in the U.S. and overseas, he found himself with pianos handy, and more time to practice than he had ever had before. By a happy coincidence, he was practically isolated from jazz at this particular time. Sheltered by this combination of circumstances, his own musical personality took its definite shape.

"I couldn't be influenced by anybody then," Hawes has said of this period of isolation, "because I couldn't hear anybody."

By the time he got out of the Army, Hawes's earlier influences had been reduced to mere suggestive echoes in his playing. All that remained of them were those elements which could contribute to his own sense of jazz fitness. He became himself rather than an amalgam-a warm, thoughtful, swinging musician whose inclination is to express himself within a cool framework.

The Hawes you hear on these selections is the end result of almost 20 years of pianistic growth. But this should not be taken as the ultimate Hawes. He is not a static musician. He has reached his present state of development because he has been eternally dissatisfied. He is still dissatisfied. He is still searching and reaching. He feels that he hasn't really come into his own yet.

"There's so much to be learned on the piano every day you play," he has said. "It's a lifetime instrument. Once I told Art Tatum that I was trying to play something and wondering when I could get it. Art said, 'Don't worry, I've been doing the same thing all my life. There's no limit to what you can do."

It was this sense of searching development which prompted Hawes to hold back "Polka Dots and Moonbeams" until his third LP. He plays relative changes on the basic chords in the first eight bars, rather than the actual chords of the tune, and he wasn't satisfied that he had found the right chords to go along with the basic chords when his first two albums were recorded. So he waited and experimented until he achieved the result you hear here.

The tunes that Hamp has chosen to play on this collection are, like those on his first two LPs for Contemporary (The Trio: vol. 1, C3505 and The Trio: vol. 2, C3515), predominantly familiar standards. It is typical of Hawes's outlook that he has deliberately introduced himself to record buyers with well-known material rather than originals. He is a far cry from those iconoclastic jazzmen who feel it is beneath them to meet their audiences halfway. He contends that you can please the public and still be a good musician. He thinks people will have a better opportunity to understand his manner of playing, to become familiar with his ideas, if they hear his ideas and his style applied to tunes that are already well established.

Is this-to use a term that is sometimes spat out as though it were spelled with four letters-being "commercial"? Hawes thinks it is. And he sees nothing wrong with being intelligently commercial. The mistake, he says, is in the way the term is used-when it is used by musicians to mean playing something they don't want to play or in a style that they don't like.

So he leads off with a tune that is both a great standard and a favorite of other pianists, "Somebody Loves Me," which shows off his swinging, full-bodied attack. The version of "Embraceable You" that he plays here may be the first of a series of Hawes's recordings of this evergreen ballad if Hamp has his way. It is a tune that is done differently every time it is played, he says. The better you get musically, according to Hamp, the better you can play it. So he plans to continue recording it in the future. Meanwhile, this is his "Embraceable You" for 1956.

"I Remember You" is a favorite of bassist Red Mitchell's and appropriately, the redhead gets two choruses to himself. "A Night in Tunisia," one of the few standards to come out of the bop period, is rarely heard in trio form. Hamp plays half-time during the opening statement, providing a dramatic buildup for his roaring takeoff when he picks up the actual tempo.

"Billy Boy" is an instance of the odd quirks that go into building a repertoire. Hawes first heard it one night in December 1955, when Miles Davis's pianist played it. Hamp liked it and his wife, Jacque, who is a schoolteacher, was particularly taken with the idea of a jazz version because she knew it as a children's song. Hamp started fooling around with it and has become so fond of his own development that he uses it as a sign-off.

To round out the album, Hawes has included a couple of his original blues-"Cooling the Blues" and "The Sermon." Hamp once compared his playing to preaching a sermon. You have to get a feeling going to your audience, he said, and try to express your story. "The Sermon" does just that. The feeling, of course, is the blues. And in this case, Hamp was trying to express his story not only to the public at large but to-one person in particular-his father, who is a minister. "He never paid too much attention to my music," says Hamp, "and I thought maybe if I asked him to listen to my sermon, maybe he'd start to understand modern music.

-John S. Wilson (July 12, 1956)


  Соисполнители :

Chuck Thompson (Drums)
Red Mitchell (Bass)


№ п/п

Наименование трека

Текст

Длительность

Комментарий
   1 Somebody Loves Me     T       0:05:32 DeSylva, Gershwin, MacDonald
   2 The Sermon         0:03:43 Hawes
   3 Embraceable You     T       0:04:58 Gershwin, Gershwin
   4 I Remember You         0:04:28 Mercer, Schertzinger
   5 A Night In Tunisia         0:03:54 Gillespie, Paparelli
   6 Lover, Come Back To Me         0:05:13 Hammerstein, Romberg
   7 Polka Dots And Moonbeams         0:04:43 Burke, Van Heusen, VanHeusen
   8 Billy Boy         0:03:02 Traditional
   9 Body And Soul     T       0:04:17 Eyton, Green, Heyman, Sour
   10 Coolin' The Blues         0:04:18 Hawes

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