Описание CD

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  Исполнитель(и) :
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  Наименование CD :
   Soir, Dit-Elle



Год издания : 2004

Компания звукозаписи : ECM

Время звучания : 1:02:53

Код CD : ECM New Series 1869

  Комментарий (рецензия) :

CD, стоящие на полке рядом : Classics (Reconstruction)      

Tracks 1, 3, 7, 8, 11, and 12 composed in 2002.

Track 4 composed in 2003.

Track 10 composed in 1999.

All contemporary pieces are composed for the Trio Mediaeval.

Recorded April 2003, Propstei St. Gerold

The pure voices of Anna Maria Friman, Linn Andrea Fuglseth, and Torunn Ostrem Ossum combine to make Trio Mediaeval a sensation among early music fans. Yet Soir, dit-elle is largely an album of contemporary works written especially for this group by such active composers as Gavin Bryars, Ivan Moody, Andrew Smith, and Oleh Harkavyy. With the exception of the late medieval Missa Alma redemptoris mater by Leonel Power and the twelfth century chant on which it is based, the works are modern imitations in the medieval ecclesiastical style. Despite the trio's beautiful harmonies and the restful calm of its performances, the program is possibly too homogeneous and subdued for any but the most ardent devotees of chant or seekers of music for meditation. That modern composers choose to mimic ancient music - rather too obviously, with a great profusion of fauxbourdons and Landini cadences - is a sticking point for those who might wish for something more original and daring. Listeners will find little spice in the selections, which are modal and only mildly dissonant. Moody's Troparion of Kassiani and A Lion's Sleep are the most adventurous in their progressions, though conservative tastes are unlikely to be offended, for the music flows smoothly and the album's sacred ambience is never disrupted.

All Music Guide

=====

The Trio Mediaeval made a powerful impact in 2001 with their debut album "Words of the Angel", their highly distinctive vocal sound - a "Scandinavian" sound, as they define it - bringing new perspectives to the performance of sacred music.

"These three women have astonishingly beautiful voices," Robert Levine wrote in American journal Stereophile, "with individual timbres that nonetheless mingle seamlessly... Trio Mediaeval sings with feeling, depth, and - dare I say it? - soul". Such sentiments were echoed also throughout Europe. "A most impressive new group," said Britain's Early Music Review: "Their clear and unforced voices, with superb control of intonation and blend of tone, combine with an obvious musical intelligence, as evidenced by their ability to shape a musical line and give structure to a piece. Others have tried to reinterpret the medieval repertoire for soprano voices, but none as successfully as this young group."

The Norwegian-Swedish trio was formed in Oslo in 1997 and its musical direction confirmed by intensive study with The Hilliard Ensemble in Cambridge. Ex-Hilliard singer John Potter, currently leader of the Dowland Project, and producer of both the trio's ECM discs, recalls that the Trio Mediaeval "already had that creative energy and an instinctive distinctive blend when they came to our annual summer school in 1998. This blossomed still further in subsequent visits over the next two years. Their repertoire also broadened during this period, adding a considerable amount of contemporary music to the medieval and Norwegian music that they performed with such elan."

"Soir, dit-elle" reverses the ratio of old to new music found on the debut disc, though the transition from early to modern is so subtly addressed that the casual listener will more likely find him or herself in what Potter calls "a timeless present": On "Words of the Angel", the Trio sang anonymous laude, settings of devotional poems which may have dated from the 12th century. On the current disc, in his three compositions written for the Trio Mediaeval in 2002, Gavin Bryars uses the same texts and stays close to the melodic outline of the original laude. Interacting with the medieval paradigm, Bryars has said he finds himself in a context that is "exposed, so naked and unadorned… where I cannot hide behind, say, a skilfully orchestrated accompaniment - like a painter who has hitherto had the luxury of painting massive canvases with dense oils, being obliged to work in pen and ink, in black and white, on a simple piece of paper, like a Zen artist refusing the possibility of revision or correction".

Bryars' Laude provide one thread through "Soir, dit-elle". Another is the mass of Leonel Power, who rivalled Dunstable as England's great composer of religious music in the 15th century. The Power and Bryars pieces, interlaced on the album, have the effect of making the performances stand outside the flow of time, a feeling also emphasised in the new music here from Oleh Harkavyy, Ivan Moody and Andrew Smith - all of it written for the Trio Mediaeval, all of it inspired by medieval sources.

John Potter: "For the Ukrainian Oleh Harkavyy and Englishman Andrew Smith chant acts as a kind of essence from which to distil their pieces. The Kyrie, like Bryars' laude, has its roots in ancient monophony but is entirely modern. Andrew Smith uses the Regina caeli chant as a point of departure for his polyphony. Common to all of these pieces are the Marian texts: each one calls on the Madonna to intercede on behalf of humanity, whether overtly (as in the new works), or almost subliminally (in the mass movements). Trio Mediaeval has been associated with the music of Ivan Moody for several years. The two pieces here refer to two different Maries: In A Lion's Sleep the 10th century St Simeon of Metaphrastes has the mother of Christ linking theological consciousness with the crucifixion, the resurrection and the intense sorrow of a mother. In the Troparion (a Holy Week text) the 9th century nun and hymnographer Kassia speaks in the voice of the woman who anointed the feet of Christ, whom later tradition identified with Mary Magdalene. The poem traces the journey of the soul away from sin through repentance to salvation. The music takes its cue from the Byzantine chant melody for this text in current Greek Orthodox usage, in this way constantly alternating between the personal and the universal."

www.ecmrecords.com/Background/Background_1869.php

========= from the cover ===============

A Timeless Present

We think of music as being in some sense about time. This collection of pieces spans some 500 years but in a sense it is older than that, tapping into the continuing present - a timeless present perhaps - that is what medieval music means to us. On the album Words of the Angel Trio Mediaeval sang three anonymous solo laude which may have dated from the 12th century. These were settings of devotional Marian poems expressing a sentiment which reached back to the dawn of Christian music and were composed in a simple verse and refrain form that is probably much older still. On this recording Gavin Bryars has set the same texts, extrapolating on the anonymous originals, sometimes adding lines and textures but retaining the ancient outlines. The composer, interacting with both the medieval paradigm and the living soprano voice has referred to the challenge of writing something "so exposed, so naked and unadorned, where I cannot hide behind, say, a skilfully orchestrated accompaniment - like a painter who has hitherto had the luxury of painting massive canvases with dense oils, being obliged to work in pen and ink, in black and white, on a simple piece of paper, like a Zen artist refusing the possibility of revision or correction".

Leonel Power's mass calls on both that simplicity- in the form of the much older Alma redemptoris mater plainchant that is at its heart-and on the vibrant colours of late medieval polyphony. The chant is repeated by the lowest voice throughout the mass, while on this foundation the two upper voices knit an intricate counterpoint. This mass setting is probably one of the earliest to use the same cantus firmus throughout all four movements. We know nothing of the circumstances of its creation. It probably would have been sung by a small choir of men and boys. There is a small clue about the numbers of singers: although composed in three real parts (the usual number for this type of piece at this period) the highest voice divides into two in the Agnus Dei, which suggests that originally there must have been at least two voices on the top line (and therefore perhaps on the other two lines as well). Power was, with John Dunstable, the most assured of the English composers to bestride the 14th and 15th centuries and it's a measure of how successful he was that this mass has survived only in Italian sources.

The geographical diversity of the medieval musical world is reflected in the more recent music in this collection. For the Ukrainian Oleh Harkavyyand Englishman Andrew Smith chant acts as a kind of essence from which to distil their pieces. The Kyrie, like Bryars's Laude, has its roots in ancient monophony but is entirely modern. Andrew Smith uses the Regina caeli chant as a point of departure for his polyphony. Common to all of these pieces are the Marian texts: each one calls on the Madonna to intercede on behalf of humanity, whether overtly (as in the new works), or almost subliminally (in the mass movements).

Trio Mediaeval has been associated with the music of Ivan Moody for several years. The two pieces here refer to two different Maries: In A Lion's Sleep the 10th century St Simeon of Metaphrastes has the mother of Christ linking theological consciousness with the crucifixion, the resurrection and the intense sorrow of a mother. In the Troparion (a Holy Week text) the 9th century nun and hymnographer Kassia speaks in the voice of the woman who anointed the feet of Christ, whom later tradition identified with Mary Magdalene. The poem traces the journey of the soul away from sin through repentance to salvation. The music takes its cue from the Byzantine chant melody for this text in current Greek Orthodox usage, in this way constantly alternating between the personal and the universal.

-John Potter


  Соисполнители :

Andrew Smith (Composer)
Anna Maria Friman (Soprano Voice)
Gavin Bryars (Composer)
Ivan Moody (Composer)
Leonel Power (Composer)
Linn Andrea Fuglseth (Soprano Voice)
Oleh Harkavyy (Composer)
Torunn Ostrem Ossum (Soprano Voice)


№ п/п

Наименование трека

Текст

Длительность

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   1 Kyrie, For 3 Voices         0:04:13 Oleh Harkavyy
   2 Missa Alma Redemptoris Mater: Kyrie         0:04:32 Leonel Power
   3 Laude (3), For Solo Voice: Laude Novella (Lauda II)         0:03:11 Gavin Bryars
   4 Ave Regina Gloriosa (Lauda VII), For 3 Voices         0:03:57 -"-
   5 Missa Alma Redemptoris Mater: Credo         0:06:26 Leonel Power
   6 Ave Maria, For 3 Voices         0:02:43 Andrew Smith
   7 Regina Caeli, For 3 Voices         0:02:30 -"-
   8 Laude (3), For Solo Voice: Ave Donna Santissima (Lauda III)         0:03:00 Gavin Bryars
   9 Missa Alma Redemptoris Mater: Sanctus         0:05:00 Leonel Power
   10 The Troparion Of Kassiani, For 3 Voices         0:05:40 Ivan Moody
   11 Laude (3), For Solo Voice: Venite A Laudare (Lauda I)         0:03:32 Gavin Bryars
   12 A Lion's Sleep, For 3 Voices         0:09:37 Ivan Moody
   13 Missa Alma Redemptoris Mater: Agnus Dei         0:06:05 Leonel Power
   14 Alma Redemptoris Mater         0:02:29 Gregorian Chant

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