Описание CD

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  Исполнитель(и) :
   Garner, Erroll  (Piano)
◄◄◄        ►►►

  Наименование CD :
   Concert By The Sea



Год издания : 1991

Компания звукозаписи : Columbia

Музыкальный стиль : Mainstream Jazz, Bop, Swing

Время звучания : 43:40

Код CD : COL 451042 2

  Комментарий (рецензия) :

CD, стоящие на полке рядом : Jazz (Piano)      

Recorded September 19, 1955, Live in Carmel. California.

Concert by the Sea was arguably the finest record pianist Erroll Garner ever made, and he made many - a few outstanding - good recordings. But this live recording (September 19, 1955) with his trio (Eddie Calhoun, bass; Denzil Best, drums) presented a typical Garner program; it was a mixture of originals, show biz, and pop standards delivered with his unique delivery and enthusiasm. The rhythms and brilliant use of tension and release were perfectly captured. And while for many jazz listeners, Garner's deliberate structures were too orchestrated, there was an equal spontaneity in the propulsion of these orchestrations that swung as well as anything.

All Music Guide

========= from the cover ==========

Erroll Garner was a natural, a phenomenon. He never learned to read music, but he could create more of it spontaneously than the most schooled musicians in his field. He recognized the source of his gift in a characteristically modest statement: "The good Lord gave it to me and I'm trying to develop it." And he did that in his own unique fashion until he was the most popular piano player in the world. With a Manhattan telephone directory (or its foreign equivalent) adding height to the piano stool, the elfin Garner became an international star comparable to Louis Armstrong and Duke Ellington.

Like Ellington, he was a good listener with good ears and a good memory. He absorbed what he liked from all that he heard, thus constantly nourishing his melodic imagination. And it was undoubtedly his emphasis on melody and rhythm that endeared him to millions. Contrary to concepts prevalent as he rose to fame, he esteemed his audience and always sought to please or entertain it. Writing in 1971, Melvin Maddocks aptly described him as the Happy Entertainer, and at that time bitterness and anger were very much the vogue artistically. Going his own way, then as always, Garner was subconsciously linked to an earlier jazz tradition.

For all the originality of his style, the pianists whom he referred to as his basic influences were Fats Waller, Art Tatum and Earl Hines. Significantly, both Hines and Garner came out of Pittsburgh, and when producer George Avakian began to work with the latter at Columbia he had decided Garner "was the greatest thing to come along on the piano since Earl Hines." Each of these artists broke stylistically with contemporary modes and each was endlessly inventive, yet neither one saw anything demeaning in the notion of entertaining those who paid to hear him. Although communication was certainly at issue, it could be achieved with minimal compromise.

Born in 1921, Garner had begun to play piano when he was three by imitating phonograph records. He was playing publicly when he was seven and later even worked on the Allegheny riverboats before setting out for New York in 1944. There he quickly found a place for himself among the swarming jazz talents on 52nd Street, and there his prolific recording career began almost immediately. By the time he signed with Columbia in 1950 he had recorded as an unaccompanied soloist, in trios, with alto saxophonists Benny Carter and Charlie Parker, with tenor saxophonists Don Byas, Coleman Hawkins, Wardell Gray, Lucky Thompson and Teddy Edwards, with Howard McGhee, Charlie Shavers and Vic Diekenson, not to mention the orchestras of Georgie Auld and Boyd Raeburn. These achievements were a triumph of both ability and personality. Musicians liked this quiet, unassuming guy who could constantly surprise them with his keyboard fantasies.

Garner's style was essentially orchestral, unlike the horn-like, single-note style of the fashionable beboppers. His left hand laid down a firm beat like that of the rhythm guitarists in the big bands. Against it, with the right hand's phrasing lagging slightly behind, he improvised a rich tapestry of sound, one full of dynamic contrasts like those of the Ellington and Lunceford bands, where solos contrasted with brilliant ensembles and where the ensembles themselves were notable for carefully nuanced shading. Like those of such bands, too, his programs were knowingly devised to give audiences a stimulating variety of music at different tempos and in different moods. The impact of his lushly romantic versions of ballads, for example, was heightened by that of his driving interpretations of rhythmic numbers, and vice versa. In either vein, the sheer pleasure he manifested in playing reached out and enchanted listeners.

When this album, Concert By The Sea, was recorded at Carmel in California in 1955, his reputation was established and his popularity immense. The area's coastline was beautiful, the acoustics in an auditorium that had formerly been a church were perfect, and the audience was warmly appreciative, all of which undoubtedly helped inspire Garner, bassist Eddie Calhoun and drummer Denzil Best that night. Yet when Garner's manager, Martha Glaser, brought a tape of the performance to Geoi'ge Avakian, he was at first daunted by its technical deficiencies. The spirit of the music was such, however, that he devoted two weeks to making "a good-sounding master out of it," as he explained in James M. Doran's revealing book, Enroll Garner: Tire Most Happy Piano (Scarecrow Press). "The rest, as they say, is history-still the all-time biggest selling jazz piano album of them all."

The opening, "I'll Remember April," is a perfect introduction to both the album and Garner's style. It begins with a typical preliminary passage that intrigues and mystifies, the tune and direction to follow not being indicated at all. It is as though the pianist were winding himself up, for suddenly he is released as by a spring into the melody, swinging buoyantly with a compelling beat. The listener relaxes happily until brought short by dramatic bass emphases which would appear to herald some stormy development. But, no, the treble streams fleetly away again, the momentum and swing being maintained intoxicat-ingly for chorus after chorus.

'Teach Me Tonight" is a short but telling performance at an insinuating, slower tempo. Bluesy tremolos give it meaningful intensity, and the value of lions of rhythmic numbers, and vice versa. In either vein, the sheer pleasure he manifested in playing reached out and enchanted listeners.

When this album, Concert By The Sea, was recorded at Carmel in California in 1955, his reputation was established and his popularity immense. The area's coastline was beautiful, the acoustics in an auditorium that had formerly been a church were perfect, and the audience was warmly appreciative, all of which undoubtedly helped inspire Garner, bassist Eddie Calhoun and drummer Denzil Best that night. Yet when Garner's manager, Martha Glaser, brought a tape of the performance to George Avakian, he was at first daunted by its technical deficiencies. The spirit of the music was such, however, that he devoted two weeks to making "a good-sounding master out of it," as he explained in James M. Dorans revealing book, Erroll Garner: The Most Happy Piano (Scarecrow Press). "The rest, as they say, is history-still the all-time biggest selling jazz piano album of them all."

The opening, "I'll Remember April," is a perfect introduction to both the album and Garner's style. It begins with a typical preliminary passage that intrigues and mystifies, the tune and direction to follow not being indicated at all. It is as though the pianist were winding himself up, for suddenly he is released as by a spring into the melody, swinging buoyantly with a compelling beat. The listener relaxes happily until brought short by dramatic bass emphases which would appear to herald some stormy development. But, no, the treble streams fleetly away again, the momentum and swing being maintained intoxicat-ingly for chorus after chorus.

...


  Соисполнители :

Denzil Best (Drums)
Eddie Calhoun (Bass)


№ п/п

Наименование трека

Текст

Длительность

Комментарий
   1 I'll Remember April         0:04:20 DePaul, Johnston, Raye
   2 Teach Me Tonight         0:03:43 Cahn, DePaul
   3 Mambo Carmel         0:03:53 Garner
   4 Autumn Leaves     T       0:06:31 Kosma, Mercer, Prevert
   5 It's All Right With Me         0:03:30 Porter
   6 Red Top         0:03:22 Hampton, Kynard
   7 April In Paris     T       0:04:55 Duke, Harburg
   8 They Can't Take That Away From Me     T       0:04:15 Gershwin, Gershwin
   9 How Could You Do A Thing Like That To Me         0:04:13 Glenn, Roberts
   10 Where Or When     T       0:03:11 Hart, Rodgers
   11 Erroll's Theme         0:01:46 Garner

      Обозначения:

 T   'щелкнуть' - переход к тексту композиции.

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